“If music be the food of love, play on.”--Count Orsino, opening lines of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night

 

Please scroll down for more info!

 

Update: 7/19/2020--The World War I letter from July 18, 1918 is now available.

 

Also, here's a link to the playlist to hear the complete performance of Winterreise from 2004, with running translations:

 

Winterreise | Complete Performance

 

Update: 4/30/2020--Back in mid-April I was honored to be invited by Ryan McKinny to participate in a group video he was putting together, giving all of us an opportunity to remember loved ones we had lost. Since the COVID-19 quarantine started impacting the livelihood of performing artists around the globe, Ryan has been posting wonderful performance videos, some by himself, many with a great assortment of his colleagues, to his YouTube Channel, including links to various artist relief organizations. I appear in my Hollywood Squares/Zoom spot near the upper left-hand corner at 3'33", and then briefly in the bigger space to the right of the screen at 3'44".

 

No One Is Alone | Keep the Music Going

 

Update: 4/13/2020--The World War I letter from April 13, 1918 is now available.

 

Update: 4/11/2020--The World War I letter from April 11, 1918 is now available. Also, here's an aria from the Bach St. Matthew Passion. Yes, I know yesterday was Good Friday, but He is still in the tomb until the Easter Vigils start this evening after sundown. I had the visuals ready for this days ago, but ran out of time yesterday, what with mask-making and making egg noodles for the tuna casserole. Excuses, excuses! I hope you find the  artwork in this video comforting. I'll try to record something more "Easter-y" in the coming days, before posting the complete Winterreise!

 

"Mache dich, mein Herze, rein"

J.S. Bach

 

Update: 4/9/2020--More apologies in order! The World War I letter from April 2, 1918 is now available. I had prepared the April 2 and April 11 letter pages at the same time I posted the March 25 one, but then got busy with other things.

 

And I made a thing yesterday--or maybe it was the day before. Here's a link to a video on my YouTube channel:

 

Loveliest of Trees | George Butterworth

 

And a link to a trailer of a complete performance of Winterreise my sister Margaret Boulanger Hagedorn and I gave way back in 2004. The video includes running sub- or sur-titles in the original  German text and English and Spanish translations to follow along. [Note: The trailer begins with silence; don't turn up the volume!]

 

Winterreise Trailer

 

Update: 3/25/2020--The World War I letter from March 25, 1918 is now posted here.

 

Also, I apologize for the fact that this website (created in Adobe Muse) doesn't seem to load on iPhones, at least not in Safari or Chrome, or in Chrome on iPads. But it does work in Safari on iPads, and as far as I know, on most common browsers on Mac and Windows computers and laptops.

 

Update: 3/20/2020--As we all deal with varying degrees of enforced isolation during the novel coronavirus pandemic, many of my performing artist friends are posting performances online, either live living room concerts, or videos of past performances. I have very few of these available, and currently no ability to collaborate with other musicians at a safe social distance. So I am posting YouTube videos of two performances of one of my favorite baritone arias, Pierrot's “Tanzlied,” or “dance-song,” from Korngold's opera Die Tote Stadt.

 

The first is from March of 2011, with Michael Sheppard at the piano, and the added bonus of Annadaire Ingram and Katherine Keem singing the offstage soprano line.

 

Tanzlied | March 26, 2011

 

The second is from April of 2017, with Gina Di Medio Marrazza at the piano.

 

Tanzlied | April 19, 2017

More to come:

 

1. Let me tell you a story! As I don't have any voice-over or audio-book projects going at the moment, it occurred to me to “serialize” a book or series of short-stories, making chapters available here free-of-charge on a semi-regular basis. Perhaps you or your family and friends might find listening to an audiobook a pleasant way to spend some of your social distancing time. (And if you're already an Audible subscriber, or have the means and the interest to join, please check out these titles! Full-disclosure: If you join as a new member and select one of my titles as your first audiobook, I get a bounty payment.)

 

I could use your help in selecting the material:

 

  • It must be in the public domain. I'm not going to negotiate rights to any copyrighted material right now, so unless you're the author of a book you're dying to have made into an audiobook, this means books published seventy years ago. Check the publication date.
  • Something with many fairly-short chapters, or a series of truly short stories would be ideal. Or I can break up longer chapters and stories further. (The length of the chapters or individual stories will determine how often I can post installments.)
  • I'm currently leaning toward either Sherlock Holmes or Edgar Allan Poe, the latter because of my sometimes-morbid sense of humor. But I'll see what people suggest! Click this reading_time@johnboulanger.com link to submit suggestions, and if I get more than a handful, perhaps I'll set up some sort of voting system for folks to decide!

 

Scroll down for more below the picture. . .

How can you help?

 

This website has links to sites where you can donate to artist-relief organizations: keepthemusicgoing.com

 

I'm fortunate to have a government pension. But so many of my friends and colleagues who are performing artists and arts instructors have lived mostly from one performance gig or lesson to the next. This pandemic has closed off most of those opportunities.

 

Here's an excellent NPR article about How Fans Can Support Artists And Music-Industry Workers During The Outbreak.

 

Watch this space for more information in the coming days! And watch the space below for news of projects I'm working on these days.

Confusing times: The picture above is of my iPhone playing the SiriusXM app through my car stereo. But what was actually playing was Wagner's Götterdämmerung.

2. After spending some wonderful time connecting virtually with friends both old and new recently via Zoom meetings, during which some of the participants  shared vocal and instrumental music and poetry, and seeing online performances, both impromptu and planned, I've decided to try to create an online live [I hope] performance of “In Flanders Fields,” a one-man performance piece I've been preparing.

 

The “In Flanders Fields” page includes more information about this piece and a list of the 11 songs included. Because the online platforms don't seem to allow real-time collaboration between socially-distanced musicians, my thought is to find pianists willing and able to provide mp3 files of the piano parts to these, and perhaps a guitarist to play the original version of Stille Nacht that underscores a Christmas-time letter reading.

 

So please let me know if you'd be interested in participating! If there's a particular song or songs in the list you'd like to play, let me know. The more collaboration, the better!

 

Just send an email to flanders@johnboulanger.com with your ideas!

 

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